Cabinetmakers and Bench Carpenters

Description

Cut, shape, and assemble wooden articles or set up and operate a variety of woodworking machines, such as power saws, jointers, and mortisers to surface, cut, or shape lumber or to fabricate parts for wood products.

Tasks

  • Produce or assemble components of articles, such as store fixtures, office equipment, cabinets, or high-grade furniture.
  • Verify dimensions or check the quality or fit of pieces to ensure adherence to specifications.
  • Set up or operate machines, including power saws, jointers, mortisers, tenoners, molders, or shapers, to cut, mold, or shape woodstock or wood substitutes.
  • Measure and mark dimensions of parts on paper or lumber stock prior to cutting, following blueprints, to ensure a tight fit and quality product.
  • Reinforce joints with nails or other fasteners to prepare articles for finishing.
  • Attach parts or subassemblies together to form completed units, using glue, dowels, nails, screws, or clamps.
  • Establish the specifications of articles to be constructed or repaired or plan the methods or operations for shaping or assembling parts, based on blueprints, drawings, diagrams, or oral or written instructions.
  • Cut timber to the right size and shape and trim parts of joints to ensure a snug fit, using hand tools, such as planes, chisels, or wood files.
  • Match materials for color, grain, or texture, giving attention to knots or other features of the wood.
  • Trim, sand, or scrape surfaces or joints to prepare articles for finishing.
  • Bore holes for insertion of screws or dowels, by hand or using boring machines.
  • Program computers to operate machinery.
  • Estimate the amounts, types, or costs of needed materials.
  • Perform final touch-ups with sandpaper or steel wool.
  • Install hardware, such as hinges, handles, catches, or drawer pulls, using hand tools.
  • Discuss projects with customers, and draw up detailed specifications.
  • Repair or alter wooden furniture, cabinetry, fixtures, paneling, or other pieces.
  • Apply Masonite, formica, or vinyl surfacing materials.
  • Design furniture, using computer-aided drawing programs.
  • Dip, brush, or spray assembled articles with protective or decorative finishes, such as stain, varnish, paint, or lacquer.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Social Orientation
Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Accordion Maker
Alteration Worker
Antique Furniture Repairer
Antique Repairer
Apprentice, Mechanist, Wood
Boat Oar Maker
Bow Maker
Cabinet Assembler
Cabinet Builder
Cabinet Door Maker
Cabinet Installer
Cabinet Maker
Cabinet Worker
Cabinetmaker Apprentice
Chair Maker
Chair Mechanic
Chair Mender
Custom Stock Maker
Cutter
Double End Saw Operator
Double End Tenon Operator
Experimental Box Tester
Frame Builder
Framer
Furniture Builder
Furniture Maker
Guitar Maker
Hand Carver
Hand Fretted Instrument Maker
Hand Violin Maker
Harp Maker
Harpsichord Maker
Hat Block Maker
Inlayer
Last Model Maker
Machine Operator
Mantel Craftsman
Marquetry Worker
Pipe Organ Builder
Precision Assembler
Router Operator
Sample Shop Technician
Sander
Shop Worker
Smoking Pipe Maker
Special Assembler
Stock Checkerer
Technical Machine Operator
Wood Cabinetmaker Apprentice
Wood Machinist
Wood Machinist Apprentice
Wood Mechanist
Wood Ski Maker
Wood Working Assembler
Woodworker
Woodworking Bench Carpenter
Woodworking Machinist

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$14.9 hourly, $30,980 annual.
Employment (2008):
78,140 employees