Court Clerks

Description

Perform clerical duties in court of law; prepare docket of cases to be called; secure information for judges; and contact witnesses, attorneys, and litigants to obtain information for court.

Tasks

  • Prepare and issue orders of the court, such as probation orders, release documentation, sentencing information, or summonses.
  • Prepare dockets or calendars of cases to be called, using typewriters or computers.
  • Record case dispositions, court orders, or arrangements made for payment of court fees.
  • Prepare documents recording the outcomes of court proceedings.
  • Examine legal documents submitted to courts for adherence to laws or court procedures.
  • Perform administrative tasks, such as answering telephone calls, filing court documents, or maintaining office supplies or equipment.
  • Search files and contact witnesses, attorneys, or litigants to obtain information for the court.
  • Answer inquiries from the general public regarding judicial procedures, court appearances, trial dates, adjournments, outstanding warrants, summonses, subpoenas, witness fees, or payment of fines.
  • Instruct parties about timing of court appearances.
  • Explain procedures or forms to parties in cases or to the general public.
  • Record court proceedings, using recording equipment, or record minutes of court proceedings, using stenotype machines or shorthand.
  • Follow procedures to secure courtrooms or exhibits, such as money, drugs, or weapons.
  • Read charges and related information to the court and, if necessary, record defendants' pleas.
  • Swear in jury members, interpreters, witnesses, or defendants.
  • Conduct roll calls and poll jurors.
  • Collect court fees or fines and record amounts collected.
  • Prepare and mark applicable court exhibits or evidence.
  • Amend indictments when necessary and endorse indictments with pertinent information.
  • Meet with judges, lawyers, parole officers, police, or social agency officials to coordinate the functions of the court.
  • Prepare staff schedules.
  • Direct support staff in handling of paperwork processed by clerks' offices.
  • Prepare courtrooms with paper, pens, water, easels, or electronic equipment and ensure that recording equipment is working.
  • Open courts, calling them to order, and announcing judges.

Knowledge

Psychology
Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
Transportation
Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
Foreign Language
Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.
Philosophy and Theology
Knowledge of different philosophical systems and religions. This includes their basic principles, values, ethics, ways of thinking, customs, practices, and their impact on human culture.
Food Production
Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
Medicine and Dentistry
Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

Skills

Management of Material Resources
Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work.
Operation and Control
Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.
Operations Analysis
Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Troubleshooting
Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Extent Flexibility
The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Glare Sensitivity
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Trunk Strength
The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Static Strength
The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.

Interests

Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Social Orientation
Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

Lay Titles

Appellate Court Clerk
Bailiff
Case Manager
Circuit Clerk
Circuit Court Clerk
Clerk
Clerk of Court
Court Attendant
Court Clerk
Court Crier
Court Operations Clerk
Court Specialist
Courtroom Clerk
Data Transcriber
Deputy Clerk
Deputy Clerk of Court
Deputy County Clerk
Deputy Court Clerk
Docket Clerk
Judge's Clerk
Judicial Administrative Technician
Judicial Assistant
Judicial Clerk
Law Clerk
Paralegal
Process Server
Subpoena Server
Summons Server
Warrant Clerk

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$16.75 hourly, $34,830 annual.
Employment (2008):
122,710 employees