Electronics Engineering Technicians

Description

Lay out, build, test, troubleshoot, repair, and modify developmental and production electronic components, parts, equipment, and systems, such as computer equipment, missile control instrumentation, electron tubes, test equipment, and machine tool numerical controls, applying principles and theories of electronics, electrical circuitry, engineering mathematics, electronic and electrical testing, and physics. Usually work under direction of engineering staff.

Tasks

  • Read blueprints, wiring diagrams, schematic drawings, or engineering instructions for assembling electronics units, applying knowledge of electronic theory and components.
  • Test electronics units, using standard test equipment, and analyze results to evaluate performance and determine need for adjustment.
  • Perform preventative maintenance or calibration of equipment or systems.
  • Assemble, test, or maintain circuitry or electronic components, according to engineering instructions, technical manuals, or knowledge of electronics, using hand or power tools.
  • Adjust or replace defective or improperly functioning circuitry or electronics components, using hand tools or soldering iron.
  • Write reports or record data on testing techniques, laboratory equipment, or specifications to assist engineers.
  • Identify and resolve equipment malfunctions, working with manufacturers or field representatives as necessary to procure replacement parts.
  • Maintain system logs or manuals to document testing or operation of equipment.
  • Provide user applications or engineering support or recommendations for new or existing equipment with regard to installation, upgrades, or enhancements.
  • Provide customer support and education, working with users to identify needs, determine sources of problems, or to provide information on product use.
  • Maintain working knowledge of state-of-the-art tools or software by reading or attending conferences, workshops, or other training.
  • Build prototypes from rough sketches or plans.
  • Procure parts and maintain inventory and related documentation.
  • Design basic circuitry and draft sketches for clarification of details and design documentation under engineers' direction, using drafting instruments or computer-aided design (CAD) equipment.
  • Write computer or microprocessor software programs.
  • Research equipment or component needs, sources, competitive prices, delivery times, or ongoing operational costs.
  • Fabricate parts, such as coils, terminal boards, or chassis, using bench lathes, drills, or other machine tools.
  • Develop or upgrade preventative maintenance procedures for components, equipment, parts, or systems.
  • Survey satellite receival sites for proper signal level or provide technical assistance in dish location or installation, transporting dishes as necessary.

Knowledge

Psychology
Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

Skills

Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.

Abilities

Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Trunk Strength
The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
Gross Body Equilibrium
The ability to keep or regain your body balance or stay upright when in an unstable position.
Gross Body Coordination
The ability to coordinate the movement of your arms, legs, and torso together when the whole body is in motion.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Extent Flexibility
The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Stamina
The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
Dynamic Strength
The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Automation Technician
Calibration and Instrumentation Technician
Calibration Laboratory Technician
Certified Control Systems Technician
CNC Programmer (Computer Numerical Control Programmer)
Computer Engineering Technician
Controls Technician
Developmental Electronics Assembler
Digital Technician
Drafting Technician
Electrical Engineer
Electrical Instrument Repairer
Electrical Mechanical Fabrication Technician
Electrical Mechanical Technician
Electrical Technician
Electronic Development Technician
Electronic Specialist
Electronic Systems Technician (EST)
Electronic Technologist
Electronics Engineering Technician
Electronics Engineering Technologist
Electronics Technician
Electronics Test Technician
Engineering Aide
Engineering Technician
Failure Analysis Technician (FA Technician)
Field Engineer
Instrument Mechanic
Instrument Repairer
Instrument Technician
Instrument Technician Apprentice
Instrumentation Technician
Laser Technician
Laser/Electro-Optics Technician (LEOT)
Network Engineer
Process Analyst
Refurbish Technician (Refurb Tech)
Research Instrumentation Technician
Robot Technician
Robotics Technician
Semiconductor Development Technician
Technician
Test Engineer
Test Engineering Aide
Test Technician
Tube Rebuilder
Weapons System Instrument Mechanic

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$27.81 hourly, $57,850 annual.
Employment (2008):
144,460 employees