Electronics Engineers, Except Computer

Description

Research, design, develop, or test electronic components and systems for commercial, industrial, military, or scientific use employing knowledge of electronic theory and materials properties. Design electronic circuits and components for use in fields such as telecommunications, aerospace guidance and propulsion control, acoustics, or instruments and controls.

Tasks

  • Operate computer-assisted engineering and design software and equipment to perform engineering tasks.
  • Design electronic components, software, products, or systems for commercial, industrial, medical, military, or scientific applications.
  • Prepare engineering sketches or specifications for construction, relocation, or installation of equipment, facilities, products, or systems.
  • Confer with engineers, customers, vendors or others to discuss existing and potential engineering projects or products.
  • Analyze system requirements, capacity, cost, and customer needs to determine feasibility of project and develop system plan.
  • Evaluate operational systems, prototypes and proposals and recommend repair or design modifications, based on factors such as environment, service, cost, and system capabilities.
  • Develop or perform operational, maintenance, or testing procedures for electronic products, components, equipment, or systems.
  • Provide technical support and instruction to staff or customers regarding equipment standards, assisting with specific, difficult in-service engineering.
  • Inspect electronic equipment, instruments, products, or systems to ensure conformance to specifications, safety standards, or applicable codes or regulations.
  • Plan or develop applications or modifications for electronic properties used in components, products, or systems to improve technical performance.
  • Prepare, review, or maintain maintenance schedules, design documentation, or operational reports or charts.
  • Plan and implement research, methodology, and procedures to apply principles of electronic theory to engineering projects.
  • Prepare documentation containing information such as confidential descriptions or specifications of proprietary hardware or software, product development or introduction schedules, product costs, or information about product performance weaknesses.
  • Prepare necessary criteria, procedures, reports, or plans for successful conduct of the project with consideration given to site preparation, facility validation, installation, quality assurance, or testing.
  • Review and evaluate work of others, inside and outside the organization, to ensure effectiveness, technical adequacy and compatibility in the resolution of complex engineering problems.
  • Determine material and equipment needs and order supplies.
  • Direct or coordinate activities concerned with manufacture, construction, installation, maintenance, operation, or modification of electronic equipment, products, or systems.
  • Review or prepare budget and cost estimates for equipment, construction, and installation projects, and control expenditures.
  • Represent employer at conferences, meetings, boards, panels, committees, or working groups to present, explain, or defend findings or recommendations, negotiate compromises or agreements, or exchange information.
  • Develop solar photovoltaic products, such as inverters or energy management systems.
  • Investigate green consumer electronics applications for consumer electronic devices, power saving devices for computers or televisions, or energy efficient power chargers.
  • Research or develop electronics technologies for use in electric-drive vehicles.
  • Research or develop new green electronics technologies, such as lighting, optical data storage devices, or energy efficient televisions.

Knowledge

Medicine and Dentistry
Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
Therapy and Counseling
Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.
Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

Abilities

Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Night Vision
The ability to see under low light conditions.
Peripheral Vision
The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.
Glare Sensitivity
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Interests

Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.

Work Values

Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.

Lay Titles

Advisory Engineer
Antenna Engineer
Application Engineer
Automation Engineer
Broadcast Engineer
Cadence Engineer
Central Office Equipment Engineer
Central Office Facilities Planning Engineer
Circuit Design Engineer
Circuit Designer
Commercial Engineer
Communications Engineer
Consulting Engineer
Controls Engineer
Customer Equipment Engineer
Design Engineer
Design Engineering Manager
Dial Equipment Engineer
Electrical Electronics Engineers
Electrical Engineer
Electronic Design Automation Engineer (EDA Engineer)
Electronic Parts Designer
Electronic System Engineer
Electronics Design Engineer
Electronics Engineer
Electronics Research Engineer
Electronics Test Engineer
Electrophonic Engineer
Engineer
Engineer Specialist
Engineering Manager
Equipment Engineer
Failure Analysis Technician
Guidance and Control System Engineer
Integrated Circuit Design Engineer (IC Design Engineer)
Manufacturing Engineer
Microwave Engineer
Microwave Supervisor
Nanotechnologist
Outside Plant Cable Engineer
Outside Plant Engineer
Product Engineer
Radar Engineer
Radio Frequency Engineer (RF Engineer)
Studio Operations Engineer-in-Charge
Supplier Quality Engineer (SQE)
Telecommunications Engineer
Telecommunications Specialist
Test Engineer
Test Engineering Manager
Traffic Circuit Engineer
Transmission and Protection Engineer
Transmitter Engineer
Validation Engineer
Validation Specialist

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$44.14 hourly, $91,820 annual.
Employment (2008):
134,960 employees