File Clerks

Description

File correspondence, cards, invoices, receipts, and other records in alphabetical or numerical order or according to the filing system used. Locate and remove material from file when requested.

Tasks

  • Keep records of materials filed or removed, using logbooks or computers.
  • Add new material to file records or create new records as necessary.
  • Perform general office duties such as typing, operating office machines, and sorting mail.
  • Track materials removed from files to ensure that borrowed files are returned.
  • Gather materials to be filed from departments or employees.
  • Sort or classify information according to guidelines, such as content, purpose, user criteria, or chronological, alphabetical, or numerical order.
  • Find and retrieve information from files in response to requests from authorized users.
  • Scan or read incoming materials to determine how and where they should be classified or filed.
  • Place materials into storage receptacles, such as file cabinets, boxes, bins, or drawers, according to classification and identification information.
  • Assign and record or stamp identification numbers or codes to index materials for filing.
  • Answer questions about records or files.
  • Modify or improve filing systems or implement new filing systems.
  • Perform periodic inspections of materials or files to ensure correct placement, legibility, or proper condition.
  • Eliminate outdated or unnecessary materials, destroying them or transferring them to inactive storage, according to file maintenance guidelines or legal requirements.
  • Enter document identification codes into systems in order to determine locations of documents to be retrieved.
  • Operate mechanized files that rotate to bring needed records to a particular location.
  • Design forms related to filing systems.
  • Retrieve documents stored in microfilm or microfiche and place them in viewers for reading.

Knowledge

Design
Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
Physics
Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.

Skills

Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Operation Monitoring
Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Troubleshooting
Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Auditory Attention
The ability to focus on a single source of sound in the presence of other distracting sounds.
Glare Sensitivity
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.
Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Night Vision
The ability to see under low light conditions.
Peripheral Vision
The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.

Interests

Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Administrative Assistant
Administrative Support Technician
Admissions Clerk
Blueprint Clerk
Brand Recorder
Card Filer
Claims Clerk
Classification Clerk
Computer Aide
Computer Tape Librarian
Control Clerk
Credit Card Clerk
Cut File Clerk
Cut Filer
Death Surveys Coder
Deputy Clerk
Document Clerk
Document Coordinator
Documentation Specialist
Enrollment Clerk
Enrollment Specialist
File Clerk
File Keeper
Filer
Finance Clerk
Fingerprint Clerk
History Card Clerk
Human Resources Assistant (HR Assistant)
Identifications Clerk
Imaging Clerk
Import Export Clerk
Index Clerk
Indexer
Information Clerk
Intelligence Clerk
Invoice Coder
Kardex Clerk
Librarian
Line Assigner
Lister
Manufacturing Clerk
Map Clerk
Medical Records Clerk
Medical Records Coder
Medical Records File Clerk
Morgue Keeper
Morgue Librarian
Office Assistant
Office Specialist
Police Records Clerk
Pre Coder
Record Clerk
Record Filing Clerk
Record Keeper
Records Clerk
Records Custodian
Records Manager
Records Specialist
Support Technician
Tape Librarian

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$12.59 hourly, $26,190 annual.
Employment (2008):
158,580 employees