Financial Analysts

Description

Conduct quantitative analyses of information affecting investment programs of public or private institutions.

Tasks

  • Draw charts and graphs, using computer spreadsheets, to illustrate technical reports.
  • Inform investment decisions by analyzing financial information to forecast business, industry, or economic conditions.
  • Monitor developments in the fields of industrial technology, business, finance, and economic theory.
  • Interpret data on price, yield, stability, future investment-risk trends, economic influences, and other factors affecting investment programs.
  • Monitor fundamental economic, industrial, and corporate developments by analyzing information from financial publications and services, investment banking firms, government agencies, trade publications, company sources, or personal interviews.
  • Recommend investments and investment timing to companies, investment firm staff, or the public.
  • Determine the prices at which securities should be syndicated and offered to the public.
  • Prepare plans of action for investment, using financial analyses.
  • Evaluate and compare the relative quality of various securities in a given industry.
  • Present oral or written reports on general economic trends, individual corporations, and entire industries.
  • Contact brokers and purchase investments for companies, according to company policy.
  • Collaborate with investment bankers to attract new corporate clients to securities firms.
  • Conduct financial analyses related to investments in green construction or green retrofitting projects.
  • Determine the financial viability of alternative energy generation or fuel production systems, based on power source or feedstock quality, financing costs, potential revenue, and total project costs.
  • Evaluate financial viability and potential environmental benefits of cleantech innovations to secure capital investments from sources such as venture capital firms and government green fund grants.
  • Forecast or analyze financial costs associated with climate change or other environmental factors, such as clean water supply and demand.
  • Identify potential financial investments that are environmentally sound, considering issues such as carbon emissions and biodiversity.
  • Research and recommend environmentally-related financial products, such as energy futures, water rights, carbon credits, government environmental funds, and cleantech industry funds and company stocks.

Knowledge

Geography
Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
Production and Processing
Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
Engineering and Technology
Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
Food Production
Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.

Skills

Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Operation and Control
Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Troubleshooting
Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Quality Control Analysis
Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.

Abilities

Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Trunk Strength
The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
Depth Perception
The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from you, or to judge the distance between you and an object.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Multilimb Coordination
The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Manual Dexterity
The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.

Interests

Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.

Work Values

Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

Lay Titles

Bank Analyst
Banking Analyst
Bond Analyst
Budget Analyst
Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA)
Commodity Analyst
Corporate Financial Analyst
Credit Products Officer
Equity Research Analyst
Finance Analyst
Financial Advisor
Financial Analyst
Financial Manager
Financial Planner
Financial Systems Analyst
Fiscal Analyst
Investment Analyst
Investment Officer
Investments Manager
Investor
Money Manager
Mutual Fund Accountant
Operational Risk Analyst
Planning Analyst
Portfolio Analyst
Pricing Specialist
Real Estate Analyst
Real Estate Investor
Research Analyst
Securities Analyst
Securities Consultant
Securities Research Analyst
Statistical Financial Analyst
Stock Analyst
Treasury Analyst
Trust Evaluation Supervisor

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$37.0 hourly, $76,950 annual.
Employment (2008):
239,810 employees