Fish and Game Wardens

Description

Patrol assigned area to prevent fish and game law violations. Investigate reports of damage to crops or property by wildlife. Compile biological data.

Tasks

  • Patrol assigned areas by car, boat, airplane, horse, or on foot to enforce game, fish, or boating laws or to manage wildlife programs, lakes, or land.
  • Investigate hunting accidents and reports of fish and game law violations, and issue warnings or citations and file reports as necessary.
  • Serve warrants, make arrests, and compile and present evidence for court actions.
  • Protect and preserve native wildlife, plants, or ecosystems.
  • Promote or provide hunter or trapper safety training.
  • Seize equipment used in fish and game law violations, and arrange for disposition of fish or game illegally taken or possessed.
  • Provide assistance to other local law enforcement agencies as required.
  • Address schools, civic groups, sporting clubs, or the media to disseminate information concerning wildlife conservation and regulations.
  • Recommend revisions in hunting and trapping regulations or in animal management programs so that wildlife balances or habitats can be maintained.
  • Inspect commercial operations relating to fish or wildlife, recreation, or protected areas.
  • Collect and report information on populations or conditions of fish and wildlife in their habitats, availability of game food or cover, or suspected pollution.
  • Survey areas and compile figures of bag counts of hunters to determine the effectiveness of control measures.
  • Participate in search-and-rescue operations and in firefighting efforts.
  • Investigate crop, property, or habitat damage or destruction or instances of water pollution to determine causes and to advise property owners of preventive measures.
  • Design or implement control measures to prevent or counteract damage caused by wildlife or people.
  • Document the extent of crop, property, or habitat damage and make financial loss estimates or compensation recommendations.
  • Supervise the activities of seasonal workers.
  • Issue licenses, permits, or other documentation.
  • Provide advice or information to park or reserve visitors.
  • Perform facilities maintenance work, such as constructing or repairing structures or controlling weeds or pests.

Knowledge

Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

Skills

Management of Financial Resources
Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.
Management of Material Resources
Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.

Abilities

Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Work Activities

Drafting, Laying Out, and Specifying Technical Devices, Parts, and Equipment
Providing documentation, detailed instructions, drawings, or specifications to tell others about how devices, parts, equipment, or structures are to be fabricated, constructed, assembled, modified, maintained, or used.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Style

Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.

Lay Titles

Conservation Officer
District Wildlife Manager
Fishing Game Warden
Game and Fish Protector
Game Protector
Game Warden
Mammal Control Agent
Natural Resource Officer
Park Guard
Park Warden
State Conservation Officer
State Game Protector
State Game Warden
Warden
Wildlife Control Agent
Wildlife Manager
Wildlife Officer
Wildlife Protector
Woods Warden

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$23.11 hourly, $48,070 annual.
Employment (2008):
6,320 employees