Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers

Description

Study the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the Earth. May use geological, physics, and mathematics knowledge in exploration for oil, gas, minerals, or underground water; or in waste disposal, land reclamation, or other environmental problems. May study the Earth's internal composition, atmospheres, oceans, and its magnetic, electrical, and gravitational forces. Includes mineralogists, crystallographers, paleontologists, stratigraphers, geodesists, and seismologists.

Tasks

  • Analyze and interpret geological, geochemical, or geophysical information from sources such as survey data, well logs, bore holes, or aerial photos.
  • Locate and estimate probable natural gas, oil, or mineral ore deposits or underground water resources, using aerial photographs, charts, or research or survey results.
  • Plan or conduct geological, geochemical, or geophysical field studies or surveys, sample collection, or drilling and testing programs used to collect data for research or application.
  • Analyze and interpret geological data, using computer software.
  • Search for and review research articles or environmental, historical, and technical reports.
  • Assess ground or surface water movement to provide advice regarding issues such as waste management, route and site selection, or the restoration of contaminated sites.
  • Prepare geological maps, cross-sectional diagrams, charts, or reports concerning mineral extraction, land use, or resource management, using results of fieldwork or laboratory research.
  • Investigate the composition, structure, or history of the Earth's crust through the collection, examination, measurement, or classification of soils, minerals, rocks, or fossil remains.
  • Conduct geological or geophysical studies to provide information for use in regional development, site selection, or development of public works projects.
  • Measure characteristics of the Earth, such as gravity or magnetic fields, using equipment such as seismographs, gravimeters, torsion balances, or magnetometers.
  • Inspect construction projects to analyze engineering problems, applying geological knowledge and using test equipment and drilling machinery.
  • Design geological mine maps, monitor mine structural integrity, or advise and monitor mining crews.
  • Identify risks for natural disasters such as mud slides, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions, providing advice on mitigation of potential damage.
  • Advise construction firms or government agencies on dam or road construction, foundation design, land use, or resource management.
  • Test industrial diamonds or abrasives, soil, or rocks to determine their geological characteristics, using optical, x-ray, heat, acid, or precision instruments.
  • Communicate geological findings by writing research papers, participating in conferences, or teaching geological science at universities.
  • Develop applied software for the analysis and interpretation of geological data.
  • Identify deposits of construction materials, and assess the materials' characteristics and suitability for use as concrete aggregates, road fill, or in other applications.
  • Collaborate with medical or health researchers to address health problems related to geological materials or processes.
  • Determine methods to incorporate geo-methane or methane hydrates into global energy production or evaluate the potential environmental impacts of such incorporation.
  • Determine ways to mitigate the negative consequences of mineral dust dispersion.
  • Develop strategies for more environmentally friendly resource extraction and reclamation.
  • Develop ways to capture or use gases that are currently burned off as waste during oil production processes.
  • Identify new sources for Platinum Group Elements necessary for industrial uses, such as automotive fuel cells or pollution abatement systems.
  • Identify possible sites for carbon sequestration projects.
  • Locate potential sources of geothermal energy.
  • Provide advice on the safe siting of new nuclear reactor projects or methods of nuclear waste management.
  • Research geomechanical or geochemical processes to be used in carbon sequestration projects.
  • Research ways to reduce the ecological footprint of increasingly prevalent megacities.
  • Review environmental cleanup work plans to determine the effectiveness of the remedial activities for mitigating soil or groundwater contamination.
  • Study historical climate change indicators found in locations such as ice sheets or rock formations to develop models related to current climate changes.

Knowledge

Foreign Language
Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.

Skills

Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Glare Sensitivity
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Static Strength
The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Manual Dexterity
The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.

Interests

Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

Work Values

Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

Lay Titles

Core Analysis Operator
Core Analyst
Crystallographer
Development Geologist
Engineering Geologist
Environmental Consultant
Environmental Field Office Manager
Environmental Geologist
Environmental Protection Geologist
Environmental Specialist
Exploration Geologist
Geochemist
Geodesist
Geologic Advisor
Geological Scout
Geological Specialist
Geologist
Geomorphologist
Geophysical Laboratory Director
Geophysical Laboratory Supervisor
Geophysical Prospector
Geophysical Surveyor
Geophysicist
Geoscientist
Geotechnical Engineer
Grade Control Geologist
Hydrogeologist
Invertebrate Paleontologist
Marine Geologist
Micro Paleontologist
Mine Geologist
Mineralogist
Mining Production Geologist
Oceanographer
Oceanologist
Oil and Gas Industry Geophysical Consultant
Paleontologist
Petrographer
Petroleum Geologist
Petrologist
Project Geologist
Project Geophysicist
Prospector
Research Geologist
Sedimentationist
Soils Engineer
Stratigrapher
Volcanologist

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$43.7 hourly, $90,890 annual.
Employment (2008):
35,180 employees