Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

Description

Drive a tractor-trailer combination or a truck with a capacity of at least 26,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW). May be required to unload truck. Requires commercial drivers' license.

Tasks

  • Check vehicles to ensure that mechanical, safety, and emergency equipment is in good working order.
  • Maneuver trucks into loading or unloading positions, following signals from loading crew and checking that vehicle and loading equipment are properly positioned.
  • Collect delivery instructions from appropriate sources, verifying instructions and routes.
  • Maintain logs of working hours or of vehicle service or repair status, following applicable state and federal regulations.
  • Report vehicle defects, accidents, traffic violations, or damage to the vehicles.
  • Secure cargo for transport, using ropes, blocks, chain, binders, or covers.
  • Drive trucks to weigh stations before and after loading and along routes to document weights and to comply with state regulations.
  • Drive trucks with capacities greater than 3 tons, including tractor-trailer combinations, to transport and deliver products, livestock, or other materials.
  • Obtain receipts or signatures for delivered goods and collect payment for services when required.
  • Inventory and inspect goods to be moved to determine quantities and conditions.
  • Operate equipment, such as truck cab computers, CB radios, and telephones, to exchange necessary information with bases, supervisors, or other drivers.
  • Perform basic vehicle maintenance tasks, such as adding oil, fuel, or radiator fluid or performing minor repairs.
  • Check conditions of trailers after contents have been unloaded to ensure that there has been no damage.
  • Read bills of lading to determine assignment details.
  • Couple or uncouple trailers by changing trailer jack positions, connecting or disconnecting air or electrical lines, or manipulating fifth-wheel locks.
  • Check all load-related documentation to ensure that it is complete and accurate.
  • Read and interpret maps to determine vehicle routes.
  • Crank trailer landing gear up or down to safely secure vehicles.
  • Load and unload trucks, or help others with loading and unloading, operating any special loading-related equipment on vehicles and using other equipment as necessary.
  • Remove debris from loaded trailers.
  • Follow appropriate safety procedures for transporting dangerous goods.
  • Follow special cargo-related procedures, such as checking refrigeration systems for frozen foods or providing food or water for livestock.
  • Wrap goods using pads, packing paper, and containers, and secure loads to trailer walls, using straps.
  • Climb ladders to inspect loads, ensuring that cargo is secure.
  • Give directions to laborers who are packing goods and moving them onto trailers.
  • Perform emergency roadside repairs, such as changing tires or installing light bulbs, tire chains, or spark plugs.
  • Collaborate with other drivers as part of a driving team on some trips.
  • Operate trucks equipped with snowplows or sander attachments to maintain roads in winter weather.
  • Install or remove special equipment, such as tire chains, grader blades, plow blades, or sanders.
  • Place empty carts and pallets in trailers so they will be available to facilitate placement and movement of goods.
  • Drive electric or hybrid-electric powered trucks or alternative fuel-powered trucks to transport and deliver products, livestock, or other materials.
  • Operate idle reduction systems or auxiliary power systems to generate power from alternative sources, such as fuel cells, to reduce idling time, to heat or cool truck cabins, or to provide power for other equipment.
  • Plan or adjust routes based on changing conditions, using computer equipment, global positioning systems (GPS) equipment, or other navigation devices to minimize fuel consumption and carbon emissions.

Knowledge

Sociology and Anthropology
Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.

Skills

Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Aircraft Refueler
Auto Carrier Driver
Auto Crane Driver
Auto Haulaway Driver
Auto Hauler
Auto Transport Driver
Basket Operator
Batch Mixing Truck Driver
Belly Dump Driver
Bottle Hop
Bull Driver
Car Ferrier
Car Pick Up Driver
Car Pilot
Carrier Driver
CDL Driver (Commercial Drivers License Driver)
CDL Truck Driver (Commercial Drivers License Truck Driver)
Cement Mixer Driver
Cement Truck Driver
City Driver
Class a Truck Driver
Class B Driver
Co Pilot
Coal Hauler
Commercial Trailer Truck Driver
Concrete Mixer Driver
Concrete Mixing Truck Driver
Concrete Truck Driver
Construction Driver
Contract Mail Carrier
Crane Operator
Cream Gatherer
Cream Hauler
Cross Country Truck Driver
Dairy Truck Driver
Delivery Driver
Delivery Truck Driver
Diesel Truck Driver
Dray Truck Driver
Drip Pumper
Driver
Driver-Utility Worker
Dump Truck Driver
Dumpster Driver
Dumpster Operator
Explosives Truck Driver
Farm Truck Driver
Feeder Driver
Feedmobile Driver
Flatbed Truck Driver
Fuel Oil Truck Driver
Fuel Truck Driver
Furniture Mover Driver
Garbage Collector Driver
Garbage Truck Driver
Gas Truck Driver
Goat Driver
Gravel Hauler
Gravel Truck Driver
Hauler
Hazmat Materials Driver
Heavy Equipment Hauler
Heavy Trick Driver
Highway Truck Driver
Hook Up Driver
Hostler
Jockey
Jumper
Line Driver
Line Haul Driver
Livestock Trucker
Local Truck Driver
Log Truck Driver
Long Distance Trucker
Long Haul Truck Driver

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$18.37 hourly, $38,200 annual.
Employment (2008):
1,556,510 employees