Helpers--Electricians

Description

Help electricians by performing duties requiring less skill. Duties include using, supplying or holding materials or tools, and cleaning work area and equipment.

Tasks

  • Measure, cut, and bend wire and conduit, using measuring instruments and hand tools.
  • Trace out short circuits in wiring, using test meter.
  • Strip insulation from wire ends, using wire stripping pliers, and attach wires to terminals for subsequent soldering.
  • Examine electrical units for loose connections and broken insulation and tighten connections, using hand tools.
  • Construct controllers and panels, using power drills, drill presses, taps, saws and punches.
  • Drill holes and pull or push wiring through openings, using hand and power tools.
  • Clean work area and wash parts.
  • Maintain tools, vehicles, and equipment and keep parts and supplies in order.
  • Transport tools, materials, equipment, and supplies to work site by hand, handtruck, or heavy, motorized truck.
  • Install copper-clad ground rods, using a manual post driver.
  • Thread conduit ends, connect couplings, and fabricate and secure conduit support brackets, using hand tools.
  • Disassemble defective electrical equipment, replace defective or worn parts, and reassemble equipment, using hand tools.
  • Erect electrical system components and barricades, and rig scaffolds, hoists, and shoring.
  • Perform semi-skilled and unskilled laboring duties related to the installation, maintenance and repair of a wide variety of electrical systems and equipment.
  • Dig trenches or holes for installation of conduit or supports.
  • Raise, lower, or position equipment, tools, and materials, using hoist, hand line, or block and tackle.
  • Break up concrete, using airhammer, to facilitate installation, construction, or repair of equipment.
  • Requisition materials, using warehouse requisition or release forms.
  • String transmission lines or cables through ducts or conduits, under the ground, through equipment, or to towers.
  • Solder electrical connections, using soldering iron.
  • Trim trees and clear undergrowth along right-of-way.
  • Bolt component parts together to form tower assemblies, using hand tools.
  • Operate cutting torches and welding equipment, while working with conduit and metal components to construct devices associated with electrical functions.
  • Paint a variety of objects related to electrical functions.

Skills

Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Management of Financial Resources
Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Social Orientation
Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Lay Titles

Apprentice Electrician
Automotive Electrician Helper
Cable Puller
Electrical Apprentice
Electrical Assistant
Electrical Helper
Electrician
Electrician Assistant
Electrician Technician
Electrician's Helper
Journeyman Electrician
Protective Signal Installer Helper
Protective Signal Repairer Helper
Tower Erector Helper
Utilities Ground Worker

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$13.3 hourly, $27,670 annual.
Employment (2008):
59,610 employees