Hunters and Trappers

Description

Hunt and trap wild animals for human consumption, fur, feed, bait, or other purposes.

Tasks

  • Maintain and repair trapping equipment.
  • Patrol trap lines or nets to inspect settings, remove catch, and reset or relocate traps.
  • Obtain required approvals for using poisons or traps, and notify persons in areas where traps and poison are set.
  • Trap and capture quarry dead or alive for identification, relocation, or sale, using baited, scented, or camouflaged traps, snares, cages, or nets.
  • Scrape fat, blubber, or flesh from skin-sides of pelts with knives or hand scrapers.
  • Kill or stun trapped quarry, using clubs, poisons, guns, or drowning methods.
  • Select, bait, and set traps, and lay poison along trails, according to species, size, habits, and environs of birds or animals and reasons for trapping them.
  • Skin quarry, using knives, and stretch pelts on frames to be cured.
  • Travel on foot, or by using vehicles or equipment such as boats, snowmobiles, helicopters, snowshoes, or skis to reach hunting areas.
  • Track animals by checking for signs such as droppings or destruction of vegetation.
  • Pack pelts in containers, load containers onto trucks, and transport pelts to processing plants or to public auctions.
  • Participate in animal damage control, wildlife management, disease control, and research activities.
  • Teach or guide individuals or groups unfamiliar with specific hunting methods or types of prey.
  • Wash and sort pelts according to species, color, and quality.
  • Mix baits for attracting animals.
  • Decide where to set traps, using grid maps and aerial maps of hunting areas.
  • Remove designated parts such as ears or tails from slain quarry as evidence for killing bounty, using knives.
  • Train dogs for hunting.
  • Release quarry from traps or nets and transfer to cages.
  • Publicize hunting activities by writing for outdoor magazines or by making videos of their hunts.
  • Cut walk tracks for better access to traps and bait stations.
  • Cure pelts with salt and boric acid.

Knowledge

Foreign Language
Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.
Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

Skills

Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Work Activities

Repairing and Maintaining Electronic Equipment
Servicing, repairing, calibrating, regulating, fine-tuning, or testing machines, devices, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of electrical or electronic (not mechanical) principles.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.

Work Values

Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Alligator Hunter
Alligator Trapper
Animal Bounty Hunter
Animal Control Expert
Animal Damage Control Agent
Animal Trapper
Bird Trapper
Bounty Hunter
Bounty Trapper
Carriage Dogger
Carriage Operator
Carriage Rider
Carriage Setter
Chain Person
Chain Puller
Chain Tender
Chainer
Chaser
Choke Setter
Choker
Choker Hooker
Chute Greaser
Chute Tender
Climber
Clipper
Deer Hunter
Expedition Supervisor
Forestry Hunter
Fur Trapper
Game Trapper
Hunter
Hunting Guide
Lion Hunter
Moose Hunter
Mule Rider
Nuisance Trapper
Nuisance Wildlife Control Operator
Pelter
Pelts Skinner
Predator Control Trapper
Predatory Animal Exterminator
Predatory Animal Hunter
Predatory Animal Trapper
Predatory Game Hunter
Predatory Hunter
Sealer
Trapper
Trapper Instructor
Underwater Hunter-Trapper
Urban Wildlife Damage Control Specialist
Wildlife Control Operator