Industrial Safety and Health Engineers

Description

Plan, implement, and coordinate safety programs, requiring application of engineering principles and technology, to prevent or correct unsafe environmental working conditions.

Tasks

  • Maintain and apply knowledge of current policies, regulations, and industrial processes.
  • Recommend process and product safety features that will reduce employees' exposure to chemical, physical, and biological work hazards.
  • Inspect facilities, machinery, and safety equipment to identify and correct potential hazards, and to ensure safety regulation compliance.
  • Install safety devices on machinery, or direct device installation.
  • Investigate industrial accidents, injuries, or occupational diseases to determine causes and preventive measures.
  • Review plans and specifications for construction of new machinery or equipment to determine whether all safety requirements have been met.
  • Report or review findings from accident investigations, facilities inspections, or environmental testing.
  • Interview employers and employees to obtain information about work environments and workplace incidents.
  • Evaluate adequacy of actions taken to correct health inspection violations.
  • Review employee safety programs to determine their adequacy.
  • Conduct or direct testing of air quality, noise, temperature, or radiation levels to verify compliance with health and safety regulations.
  • Conduct or coordinate worker training in areas such as safety laws and regulations, hazardous condition monitoring, and use of safety equipment.
  • Provide technical advice and guidance to organizations on how to handle health-related problems and make needed changes.
  • Interpret safety regulations for others interested in industrial safety such as safety engineers, labor representatives, and safety inspectors.
  • Maintain liaisons with outside organizations such as fire departments, mutual aid societies, and rescue teams, so that emergency responses can be facilitated.
  • Write and revise safety regulations and codes.
  • Confer with medical professionals to assess health risks and to develop ways to manage health issues and concerns.
  • Compile, analyze, and interpret statistical data related to occupational illnesses and accidents.
  • Plan and conduct industrial hygiene research.
  • Check floors of plants to ensure that they are strong enough to support heavy machinery.
  • Design and build safety equipment.

Knowledge

Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.

Skills

Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Glare Sensitivity
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.
Peripheral Vision
The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Night Vision
The ability to see under low light conditions.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Style

Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Leadership
Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Chief Security and Safety Officer (CSO)
Corporate Health, Safety, and Occupational Toxicology Director
Corporate Health, Safety, and Security Manager
Environmental Affairs, Safety, and Security Manager
Environmental Health Safety Manager
Environmental Safety Specialist
Health and Safety Coordinator
Health Safety Manager
Health, Safety, and Environment Manager
Industrial Health and Safety Professor
Industrial Health Engineer
Industrial Hygiene and Safety Consultant
Industrial Safety and Health Manager
Occupational Health and Safety Environment Director
Occupational Safety and Environmental Health Consultant
Occupational Safety and Health Manager
Registered Safety Engineer
Regulatory Analyst
RHIC Systems Safety Engineer (Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider Systems Safety Engineer)
Risk Control Director
Risk Prevention Engineer
Safety and Environmental Health Corporate Director
Safety and Environmental Management Professor
Safety and Health Consultant
Safety and Risk Management Program Director
Safety Consultant
Safety Engineer
Safety Manager
Safety, Health, and Environment Vice President
Safety, Health, and Environmental Services Director
Security Engineer
Test Inspection Engineer

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$36.94 hourly, $76,830 annual.
Employment (2008):
23,490 employees