Jewelers

Description

Fabricate and repair jewelry articles. Make models or molds to create jewelry items.

Tasks

  • Smooth soldered joints and rough spots, using hand files and emery paper, and polish smoothed areas with polishing wheels or buffing wire.
  • Position stones and metal pieces, and set, mount, and secure items in place, using setting and hand tools.
  • Create jewelry from materials such as gold, silver, platinum, and precious or semiprecious stones.
  • Make repairs, such as enlarging or reducing ring sizes, soldering pieces of jewelry together, and replacing broken clasps and mountings.
  • Clean and polish metal items and jewelry pieces, using jewelers' tools, polishing wheels, and chemical baths.
  • Select and acquire metals and gems for designs.
  • Compute costs of labor and materials in order to determine production costs of products and articles.
  • Mark and drill holes in jewelry mountings in order to center stones according to design specifications.
  • Examine assembled or finished products to ensure conformance to specifications, using magnifying glasses or precision measuring instruments.
  • Construct preliminary models of wax, metal, clay, or plaster, and form sample castings in molds.
  • Pour molten metal alloys or other materials into molds in order to cast models of jewelry.
  • Cut, shape, and smooth gemstones, pearls, and metal pieces, using abrasives, grinding stones, and power and hand tools.
  • Soften metal to be used in designs by heating it with a gas torch and shape it, using hammers and dies.
  • Determine appraised values of diamonds and other gemstones based on price guides, market fluctuations, and stone grades and rarity.
  • Alter existing jewelry mountings in order to reposition jewels or to adjust mountings.
  • Grade stones based on their color, perfection, and quality of cut.
  • Plate articles such as jewelry pieces and watch dials, using silver, gold, nickel, or other metals.
  • Write or modify design specifications such as the metal contents and weights of items.
  • Create new jewelry designs and modify existing designs, using computers as necessary.
  • Examine gemstone surfaces and internal structures to evaluate genuineness, quality, and value, using polariscopes, refractometers, and other optical instruments.
  • Buy and sell jewelry, or serve as agents between buyers and sellers.
  • Record the weights and processing times of finished pieces.
  • Lay out designs on metal stock, and cut along markings to fabricate pieces used to cast metal molds.
  • Fabricate, modify, or repair jigs, fixtures, and hand tools such as scrapers, cutters, gougers, and shapers.
  • Mark, engrave, or emboss designs on metal pieces such as castings, wire, or jewelry, following specifications.
  • Cut designs in molds or other materials to be used as models in the fabrication of metal and jewelry products.
  • Design and fabricate molds, models, and machine accessories, and modify hand tools used to cast metal and jewelry pieces.
  • Research and analyze reference materials, and consult with interested parties in order to develop new products or modify existing designs.
  • Weigh, mix, and melt metal alloys or materials needed for jewelry models.
  • Remove mold castings from metal or jewelry workpieces, and place workpieces in water or on trays to cool.
  • Place metal samples in frames, pack raw rubber around samples, and clamp samples, frames, and rubber into vulcanizing machines.
  • Assemble and secure mold sections used to cast metal articles and pieces.
  • Melt and roll out metal into sheets or bars, and stamp out jewelry such as gold and silver chains, using presses or dies.
  • Build sand molds in flasks, following patterns and heat flasks to dry and harden molds, using furnaces or torches.
  • Rotate molds in order to distribute molten material and prevent formation of air pockets.
  • Remove molds from cast articles, clean them, and apply shellac and powder to preserve them for reuse.
  • Immerse gemstones in chemical solutions to determine specific gravity and other key properties necessary for identification and appraisal.
  • Burn grooves or crevices in molds in order to correct defects, using soldering guns.
  • Press models into clay, and build up clay around exposed parts of models to retain plaster.
  • Chase decorative designs on silver blanks that are to be used as models for steel production dies.

Knowledge

Geography
Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
Foreign Language
Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.
Medicine and Dentistry
Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
Therapy and Counseling
Knowledge of principles, methods, and procedures for diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of physical and mental dysfunctions, and for career counseling and guidance.
Biology
Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
Food Production
Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.

Skills

Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Trunk Strength
The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Strength
The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.
Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Extent Flexibility
The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Gross Body Equilibrium
The ability to keep or regain your body balance or stay upright when in an unstable position.
Gross Body Coordination
The ability to coordinate the movement of your arms, legs, and torso together when the whole body is in motion.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Work Activities

Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment
Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

Work Values

Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.

Lay Titles

Antique Jewelry Repairer
Arborer
Bead Maker
Bench Hand
Bench Jeweler
Bench Molder
Bench Molder Apprentice
Bracelet and Brooch Maker
Brilliandeer Looper
Caster
Centrifugal Casting Machine Operator
Certified Bench Jeweler Technician
Chain Maker
Craft Worker
Crafter
Damascener
Dial Maker
Diamond Expert
Diamond Grader
Earrings Fabricator
Engine Turner
Fancy Wire Drawer
Gemologist
Girdler
Gold Beater
Goldbeater
Goldsmith
Hammer Setter
Hammersmith
Hand Chain Maker
Jeweler
Jeweler Apprentice
Jewelry Appraiser
Jewelry Bearing Maker
Jewelry Bench Molder
Jewelry Bench Worker
Jewelry Drill Operator
Jewelry Drilling Machine Operator
Jewelry Inspector
Jewelry Maker
Jewelry Mechanic
Jewelry Model Maker
Jewelry Mold Maker
Jewelry Repairer
Jewelry Technician
Lathe Operator
Lay-Out Worker
Layout Operator
Layout Worker
Locket Maker
Model Maker
Model Maker Apprentice
Mold Maker
Mold Maker Apprentice
Oliving Machine Operator
Pearl Restorer
Phonograph Needle Tip Maker
Pronger
Ring Maker
Sample Maker
Setter
Silver Chaser
Solderer
Stone Setter
Stone Setter Apprentice
Stonecutter

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$16.99 hourly, $35,350 annual.
Employment (2008):
22,060 employees