Mechanical Door Repairers

Description

Install, service, or repair automatic door mechanisms and hydraulic doors. Includes garage door mechanics.

Tasks

  • Adjust doors to open or close with the correct amount of effort or make simple adjustments to electric openers.
  • Wind large springs with upward motion of arm.
  • Inspect job sites, assessing headroom, side room, or other conditions to determine appropriateness of door for a given location.
  • Collect payment upon job completion.
  • Complete required paperwork, such as work orders, according to services performed or required.
  • Fasten angle iron back-hangers to ceilings and tracks, using fasteners or welding equipment.
  • Repair or replace worn or broken door parts, using hand tools.
  • Carry springs to tops of doors, using ladders or scaffolding, and attach springs to tracks to install spring systems.
  • Set doors into place or stack hardware sections into openings after rail or track installation.
  • Remove or disassemble defective automatic mechanical door closers, using hand tools.
  • Install door frames, rails, steel rolling curtains, electronic-eye mechanisms, or electric door openers and closers, using power tools, hand tools, and electronic test equipment.
  • Apply hardware to door sections, such as drilling holes to install locks.
  • Assemble and fasten tracks to structures or bucks, using impact wrenches or welding equipment.
  • Run low voltage wiring on ceiling surfaces, using insulated staples.
  • Cut door stops or angle irons to fit openings.
  • Study blueprints and schematic diagrams to determine appropriate methods of installing or repairing automated door openers.
  • Operate lifts, winches, or chain falls to move heavy curtain doors.
  • Order replacement springs, sections, or slats.
  • Bore or cut holes in flooring as required for installation, using hand or power tools.
  • Set in and secure floor treadles for door activating mechanisms; then connect power packs and electrical panelboards to treadles.
  • Lubricate door closer oil chambers and pack spindles with leather washers.
  • Install dock seals, bumpers, or shelters.
  • Fabricate replacements for worn or broken parts, using welders, lathes, drill presses, or shaping or milling machines.
  • Clean door closer parts, using caustic soda, rotary brushes, or grinding wheels.
  • Cover treadles with carpeting or other floor covering materials and test systems by operating treadles.

Knowledge

Medicine and Dentistry
Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
Sociology and Anthropology
Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.

Skills

Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Work Activities

Interacting With Computers
Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Automated Access Systems Technician
Automatic Door Mechanic
Commercial Door Installer
Commercial Service Technician
Door and Operator Technician
Door Closer Mechanic
Door Installer
Door Serviceman
Door Technician
Garage Door Installer
Garage Door Opener Installer
Garage Door Service Technician
Garage Door Technician
Installation Technician
Overhead Door Installer
Overhead Door Technician
Repairman
Residential Door Installer
Service Technician

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$17.36 hourly, $36,110 annual.
Employment (2008):
15,750 employees