Office Clerks, General

Description

Perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring knowledge of office systems and procedures. Clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments and may include a combination of answering telephones, bookkeeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing.

Tasks

  • Operate office machines, such as photocopiers and scanners, facsimile machines, voice mail systems, and personal computers.
  • Answer telephones, direct calls, and take messages.
  • Maintain and update filing, inventory, mailing, and database systems, either manually or using a computer.
  • Communicate with customers, employees, and other individuals to answer questions, disseminate or explain information, take orders, and address complaints.
  • Open, sort, and route incoming mail, answer correspondence, and prepare outgoing mail.
  • Compile, copy, sort, and file records of office activities, business transactions, and other activities.
  • Compute, record, and proofread data and other information, such as records or reports.
  • Type, format, proofread, and edit correspondence and other documents, from notes or dictating machines, using computers or typewriters.
  • Complete work schedules, manage calendars, and arrange appointments.
  • Review files, records, and other documents to obtain information to respond to requests.
  • Deliver messages and run errands.
  • Inventory and order materials, supplies, and services.
  • Troubleshoot problems involving office equipment, such as computer hardware and software.
  • Collect, count, and disburse money, do basic bookkeeping, and complete banking transactions.
  • Complete and mail bills, contracts, policies, invoices, or checks.
  • Process and prepare documents, such as business or government forms and expense reports.
  • Monitor and direct the work of lower-level clerks.
  • Make travel arrangements for office personnel.
  • Train other staff members to perform work activities, such as using computer applications.
  • Prepare meeting agendas, attend meetings, and record and transcribe minutes.
  • Count, weight, measure, or organize materials.

Knowledge

Transportation
Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
Production and Processing
Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
Mechanical
Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
Medicine and Dentistry
Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.

Skills

Quality Control Analysis
Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
Operations Analysis
Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Troubleshooting
Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Gross Body Coordination
The ability to coordinate the movement of your arms, legs, and torso together when the whole body is in motion.
Gross Body Equilibrium
The ability to keep or regain your body balance or stay upright when in an unstable position.
Stamina
The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
Dynamic Strength
The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.
Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Response Orientation
The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Depth Perception
The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from you, or to judge the distance between you and an object.

Interests

Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Social Orientation
Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Accounting Clerk
Administration Clerk
Administrative Assistant
Administrative Clerk
Administrative Office Assistant
Administrative Support Specialist
Administrative Technician
Admissions Evaluator
Agent-Licensing Clerk
Animal Hospital Clerk
Animal Shelter Clerk
Appointment Scheduler
Attendance Clerk
Auction Assistant
Audit Control Clerk
Automobile Contract Clerk
Blood Bank Calendar Control Clerk
Blood Bank Credit Clerk
Blood Donor Unit Assistant
Board Attendant
Bookkeeper
Broadcast Checker
Car Distributor
Career Guidance Technician
Chart Clerk
Charter
Circulation Clerk
Clerical Aide
Clerical Assistant
Clerical Dentist Assistant
Clerical Office Worker
Clerk
Clerk Typist
Code and Test Clerk
Congressional District Aide
Copyright Expert
Court Clerk
Credit Card Clerk
Credit Card Control Clerk
Customer Service Representative
Data Entry Clerk
Data Examination Clerk
Desk Clerk
Diet Clerk
Document Coordinator
Document Processor
Election Clerk
Examination Proctor
Executive Assistant
Field Assistant
Field Clerk
Field Representative
Fingerprint Clerk
Floor Clerk
Floor Space Allocator
Front Office Clerk
General Intern
General Office Clerk
General Office Worker
Government Clerk
Grading Clerk
Greige Goods Marker
History Card Clerk
Identification Clerk
Insurance Clerk
Laboratory Clerk
Laundry Clerk
Loan Assistant
Lost and Found Clerk
Lost Charge Card Clerk
Map Clerk
Marketing Clerk
Media Clerk
Medical Office Assistant
Medical Office Worker

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$13.21 hourly, $27,470 annual.
Employment (2008):
2,808,100 employees