Procurement Clerks

Description

Compile information and records to draw up purchase orders for procurement of materials and services.

Tasks

  • Prepare purchase orders and send copies to suppliers and to departments originating requests.
  • Determine if inventory quantities are sufficient for needs, ordering more materials when necessary.
  • Respond to customer and supplier inquiries about order status, changes, or cancellations.
  • Perform buying duties when necessary.
  • Contact suppliers in order to schedule or expedite deliveries and to resolve shortages, missed or late deliveries, and other problems.
  • Review requisition orders in order to verify accuracy, terminology, and specifications.
  • Prepare, maintain, and review purchasing files, reports and price lists.
  • Compare prices, specifications, and delivery dates in order to determine the best bid among potential suppliers.
  • Track the status of requisitions, contracts, and orders.
  • Calculate costs of orders, and charge or forward invoices to appropriate accounts.
  • Check shipments when they arrive to ensure that orders have been filled correctly and that goods meet specifications.
  • Compare suppliers' bills with bids and purchase orders in order to verify accuracy.
  • Approve bills for payment.
  • Locate suppliers, using sources such as catalogs and the internet, and interview them to gather information about products to be ordered.
  • Maintain knowledge of all organizational and governmental rules affecting purchases, and provide information about these rules to organization staff members and to vendors.
  • Monitor in-house inventory movement and complete inventory transfer forms for bookkeeping purposes.
  • Monitor contractor performance, recommending contract modifications when necessary.
  • Prepare invitation-of-bid forms, and mail forms to supplier firms or distribute forms for public posting.

Knowledge

Building and Construction
Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
Chemistry
Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
Engineering and Technology
Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
Foreign Language
Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.
Physics
Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
Sociology and Anthropology
Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.

Skills

Troubleshooting
Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Operation Monitoring
Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Equipment Selection
Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Operation and Control
Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.

Abilities

Visualization
The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged.
Visual Color Discrimination
The ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness.
Hearing Sensitivity
The ability to detect or tell the differences between sounds that vary in pitch and loudness.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Static Strength
The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.
Wrist-Finger Speed
The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists.
Reaction Time
The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Rate Control
The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
Multilimb Coordination
The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.

Work Activities

Staffing Organizational Units
Recruiting, interviewing, selecting, hiring, and promoting employees in an organization.
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment
Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.

Interests

Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Buyer
Departmental Buyer
Film Replacement Orderer
Procurement Agent
Procurement Analyst
Procurement Assistant
Procurement Clerk
Procurement Officer
Procurement Specialist
Procurement Technician
Property and Supply Officer
Purchaser
Purchasing Agent
Purchasing Assistant
Purchasing Associate
Purchasing Clerk
Purchasing Coordinator
Purchasing Department Clerk
Purchasing Manager
Purchasing Specialist
Supply Coordinator
Warehouse Clerk

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$18.38 hourly, $38,220 annual.
Employment (2008):
69,750 employees