Sailors and Marine Oilers

Description

Stand watch to look for obstructions in path of vessel, measure water depth, turn wheel on bridge, or use emergency equipment as directed by captain, mate, or pilot. Break out, rig, overhaul, and store cargo-handling gear, stationary rigging, and running gear. Perform a variety of maintenance tasks to preserve the painted surface of the ship and to maintain line and ship equipment. Must hold government-issued certification and tankerman certification when working aboard liquid-carrying vessels. Includes able seamen and ordinary seamen.

Tasks

  • Maintain government-issued certifications, as required.
  • Lower and man lifeboats when emergencies occur.
  • Stand by wheels when ships are on automatic pilot and verify accuracy of courses, using magnetic compasses.
  • Steer ships under the direction of commanders or navigating officers or direct helmsmen to steer, following designated courses.
  • Handle lines to moor vessels to wharfs, to tie up vessels to other vessels, or to rig towing lines.
  • Stand watch in ships' bows or bridge wings to look for obstructions in a ship's path or to locate navigational aids, such as buoys or lighthouses.
  • Stand gangway watches to prevent unauthorized persons from boarding ships while in port.
  • Overhaul lifeboats or lifeboat gear and lower or raise lifeboats with winches or falls.
  • Operate, maintain, or repair ship equipment, such as winches, cranes, derricks, or weapons system.
  • Load or unload materials from vessels.
  • Lubricate machinery, equipment, or engine parts such as gears, shafts, or bearings.
  • Break out, rig, and stow cargo-handling gear, stationary rigging, or running gear.
  • Splice and repair ropes, wire cables, or cordage, using marlinespikes, wire cutters, twine, and hand tools.
  • Provide engineers with assistance in repairing or adjusting machinery.
  • Paint or varnish decks, superstructures, lifeboats, or sides of ships.
  • Sweep, mop, and wash down decks to remove oil, dirt, and debris, using brooms, mops, brushes, and hoses.
  • Chip and clean rust spots on decks, superstructures, or sides of ships, using wire brushes and hand or air chipping machines.
  • Give directions to crew members engaged in cleaning wheelhouses or quarterdecks.
  • Read pressure and temperature gauges or displays and record data in engineering logs.
  • Examine machinery to verify specified pressures or lubricant flows.
  • Measure depth of water in shallow or unfamiliar waters, using leadlines, and telephone or shout depth information to vessel bridges.
  • Record in ships' logs data such as weather conditions and distances traveled.
  • Attach hoses and operate pumps to transfer substances to and from liquid cargo tanks.
  • Maintain a ship's engines under the direction of the ship's engineering officers.
  • Relay specified signals to other ships, using visual signaling devices, such as blinker lights or semaphores.
  • Tie barges together into tow units for tugboats to handle, inspecting barges periodically during voyages and disconnecting them when destinations are reached.
  • Participate in shore patrols.
  • Clean and polish wood trim, brass, or other metal parts.

Skills

Operations Analysis
Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.

Lay Titles

Able Bodied Seaman (AB Seaman)
Able Bodied Tankerman (AB Tankerman)
Able Bodied Watchman (AB Watchman)
Able Bodied Wheelsman (AB Wheelsman)
Able Seaman
Barge Hand
Bargeman
Boat Crew Deck Hand
Boat Deckhand
Boat Hand
Boat Laborer
Boat or Ship Laborer
Boat Person
Boatman
Bosun
Buoy Tender
Cabin Worker
Cadet
Captain
Captain's Assistant
Chief Engineer's Helper
Chief Yeoman
Crewman
Deck Cadet
Deck Hand
Deck Mate
Deckhand
Deckhand Oiler
Engineer
Ferry Crew Member
Ferry Hand
Ferry Oiler
Ferryman
Float Tender
Floater
Floatman
Handyman
Lighterman
Lookout
Marine Firefighter
Marine Fireman
Marine Oiler
Marine Technician
Marine Water Tender
Mariner
Master at Arms
Mate
Merchant Marine
Merchant Seaman
Oiler
Ordinary Seaman
Pleasure Craft Sailor
Quarter Master
Quartermaster
Refrigerating Oiler
Rigger
River Transportation Worker
Riverman
Roustabout
Scaler
Scow Hand
Scowman
Seaman
Ship Docking Tugboat Deckhand
Steerer
Steersman
Sternman
Tankerman
Utility Worker
Water Tender
Wheelman
Wiper
Yacht Hand
Yachtsman

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$18.36 hourly, $38,190 annual.
Employment (2008):
31,500 employees