Shoe and Leather Workers and Repairers

Description

Construct, decorate, or repair leather and leather-like products, such as luggage, shoes, and saddles.

Tasks

  • Cut out parts following patterns or outlines, using knives, shears, scissors, or machine presses.
  • Construct, decorate, or repair leather products according to specifications, using sewing machines, needles and thread, leather lacing, glue, clamps, hand tools, and/or rivets.
  • Align and stitch or glue materials such as fabric, fleece, leather, or wood, in order to join parts.
  • Dye, soak, polish, paint, stamp, stitch, stain, buff, or engrave leather or other materials to obtain desired effects, decorations, or shapes.
  • Select materials and patterns, and trace patterns onto materials to be cut out.
  • Dress and otherwise finish boots or shoes, as by trimming the edges of new soles and heels to the shoe shape.
  • Estimate the costs of requested products or services such as custom footwear or footwear repair, and receive payment from customers.
  • Attach insoles to shoe lasts, affix shoe uppers, and apply heels and outsoles.
  • Cement, nail, or sew soles and heels to shoes.
  • Shape shoe heels with a knife, and sand them on a buffing wheel for smoothness.
  • Repair or replace soles, heels, and other parts of footwear, using sewing, buffing and other shoe repair machines, materials, and equipment.
  • Make, modify, and repair orthopedic or therapeutic footwear according to doctors' prescriptions, or modify existing footwear for people with foot problems and special needs.
  • Repair and recondition leather products such as trunks, luggage, shoes, saddles, belts, purses, and baseball gloves.
  • Place shoes on lasts to remove soles and heels, using knives and/or pliers.
  • Clean and polish shoes.
  • Check the texture, color, and strength of leather to ensure that it is adequate for a particular purpose.
  • Read prescriptions or specifications, and take measurements to establish the type of product to be made, using calipers, tape measures, or rules.
  • Inspect articles for defects, and remove damaged or worn parts, using hand tools.
  • Drill or punch holes; then insert or attach metal rings, handles, and fastening hardware such as buckles.
  • Attach accessories or ornamentation to decorate or protect products.
  • Cut, insert, position, and secure paddings, cushioning, and/or linings, using stitches or glue.
  • Draw patterns, using measurements, designs, plaster casts, or customer specifications, and position or outline patterns on work pieces.
  • Measure customers for fit, and discuss with them the type of footwear to be made, recommending details such as leather quality.
  • Stretch shoes, first dampening parts; then inserting and twisting parts, using an adjustable stretcher.
  • Nail heel and toe cleats onto shoes.
  • Prepare inserts, heel pads, and lifts from casts of customers' feet.
  • Re-sew seams, and replace handles and linings of suitcases or handbags.

Knowledge

Public Safety and Security
Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
Computers and Electronics
Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
Fine Arts
Knowledge of the theory and techniques required to compose, produce, and perform works of music, dance, visual arts, drama, and sculpture.
Telecommunications
Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

Skills

Management of Financial Resources
Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures.
Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Learning Strategies
Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
Technology Design
Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Systems Evaluation
Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.
Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.

Abilities

Night Vision
The ability to see under low light conditions.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Peripheral Vision
The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.
Glare Sensitivity
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Back Shoe Cutter
Backshoe Person
Belt Maker
Bench Hand
Boot Maker
Boot Repairer
Bootmaker
Bottom Cementer
Cobbler
Cobbler Apprentice
Crowning Inspector
Custom Leather Products Maker
Custom Shoemaker
Cutter
Dyer
Finger Cobbler
Glove Factory Sewer
Hand Bootmaker
Harness Maker
Harnessmaker
Harnessmaker Apprentice
Industrial Sewer
Jack
Jackman
Lacer
Last Repairer Helper
Leather Cutter
Leather Lacer
Leather Production Worker
Leather Stamper
Leather Worker
Leathersmith
Luggage Maker
Luggage Repairer
Mender
Orthopedic Boot and Shoe Designer and Maker
Orthopedic Shoe Maker
Pad Hand
Renovator
Repairer
Saddle and Harness Maker
Saddle Maker
Saddle Mechanic
Sample Shoe Inspector and Reworker
Seamstress
Sewing Machine Operator
Shoe Cobbler
Shoe Cutter
Shoe Designer
Shoe Dyer
Shoe Maker
Shoe Reconditioner
Shoe Repairer
Shoe Repairer Apprentice
Shoe Repairer Helper
Shoe Repairman
Shoe Stainer
Shoe Stitcher
Shoemaker
Shoemaker Apprentice
Skate Maker
Stitcher
Trimming Cutter
Upper Cutter
Western Tack Assembly Line Worker

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$11.52 hourly, $23,950 annual.
Employment (2008):
5,750 employees