Shoe Machine Operators and Tenders

Description

Operate or tend a variety of machines to join, decorate, reinforce, or finish shoes and shoe parts.

Tasks

  • Study work orders and/or shoe part tags to obtain information about workloads, specifications, and the types of materials to be used.
  • Remove and examine shoes, shoe parts, and designs to verify conformance to specifications such as proper embedding of stitches in channels.
  • Perform routine equipment maintenance such as cleaning and lubricating machines or replacing broken needles.
  • Cut excess thread or material from shoe parts, using scissors or knives.
  • Turn screws to regulate size of staples.
  • Align parts to be stitched, following seams, edges, or markings, before positioning them under needles.
  • Turn setscrews on needle bars, and position required numbers of needles in stitching machines.
  • Switch on machines, then lower pressure feet or rollers to secure parts and start machine stitching, using hand, foot, or knee controls.
  • Collect shoe parts from conveyer belts or racks and place them in machinery such as ovens or on molds for dressing, returning them to conveyers or racks to send them to the next work station.
  • Position dies on material in a manner that will obtain the maximum number of parts from each portion of material.
  • Test machinery to ensure proper functioning before beginning production.
  • Operate or tend machines to join, decorate, reinforce, or finish shoes and shoe parts.
  • Draw thread through machine guide slots, needles, and presser-feet in preparation for stitching, or load rolls of wire through machine axles.
  • Fill shuttle spools with thread from a machine's bobbin-winder by pressing a foot-treadle.
  • Load hot-melt plastic rod glue through reactivator axles, using wrenches, then switch on reactivators, setting temperature and timers to heat glue to specifications.
  • Staple sides of shoes, pressing a foot-treadle to position and hold each shoe under the feeder of the machine.
  • Select and place spools of thread or pre-wound bobbins into shuttles, or onto spindles or loupers of stitching machines.
  • Hammer loose staples for proper attachment.
  • Turn knobs to adjust stitch length and thread tension.

Skills

Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Speed of Limb Movement
The ability to quickly move the arms and legs.
Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Night Vision
The ability to see under low light conditions.
Peripheral Vision
The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.

Work Values

Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

Lay Titles

Anchor Operator
Anchorer
Ankle Patch Molder
Antiquer
Apron Trimmer
Arch Cushion Press Operator
Archer
Assembler
Back Closer
Back Stayer
Back Strip Machine Operator
Back Wedger
Barrer
Bed Laster
Bed Machine Operator
Binding Dyer
Binding Stitcher
Block Hand
Block Out Machine Operator
Bobbin Winder
Boot and Shoe Repairman
Boot Maker
Boot Trimmer
Bottom Cementer
Bottom Filler
Bottom Finisher
Bottom Painter
Bottom Polisher
Bottom Sprayer
Bow Machine Operator
Box Toe Maker
Breaster
Brusher
Brushing Machine Operator
Buckle Attacher
Buckle Sewer
Buckler and Lacer
Buffer
Burnisher
Burnishing Machine Operator
Button Sewer
Caser Up
Cementer
Channel Cementer
Channel Layer
Channel Lip Wetter
Channel Opener
Channel Turner
Channeler
Channeling Machine Operator
Closer
Closer On
Clother In
Concaver
Cookie Padder
Cordwainer
Counter Cutter
Counter Former
Counter Maker
Counter Molder
Counter Roller
Counter Stacker
Counter Stitcher
Cripple Chaser
Cripple Cutter
Cripple Worker
Crowner
Cushion Sewer
Cut Out Machine Operator
Cut Out Operator
Cut Out Stitcher
Cutter
Deskidding Machine Operator
Die Cutter
Die Out Worker

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$11.69 hourly, $24,310 annual.
Employment (2008):
3,420 employees