Traffic Technicians

Description

Conduct field studies to determine traffic volume, speed, effectiveness of signals, adequacy of lighting, and other factors influencing traffic conditions, under direction of traffic engineer.

Tasks

  • Interact with the public to answer traffic-related questions, respond to complaints or requests, or discuss traffic control ordinances, plans, policies, or procedures.
  • Prepare drawings of proposed signal installations or other control devices, using drafting instruments or computer-automated drafting equipment.
  • Provide technical supervision regarding traffic control devices to other traffic technicians or laborers.
  • Analyze data related to traffic flow, accident rates, or proposed development to determine the most efficient methods to expedite traffic flow.
  • Plan, design, and improve components of traffic control systems to accommodate current or projected traffic and to increase usability and efficiency.
  • Prepare work orders for repair, maintenance, or changes in traffic systems.
  • Lay out pavement markings for striping crews.
  • Study factors affecting traffic conditions, such as lighting or sign and marking visibility, to assess their effectiveness.
  • Gather and compile data from hand count sheets, machine count tapes, or radar speed checks and code data for computer input.
  • Operate counters and record data to assess the volume, type, and movement of vehicular or pedestrian traffic at specified times.
  • Monitor street or utility projects for compliance to traffic control permit conditions.
  • Review traffic control or barricade plans to issue permits for parades or other special events or for construction work that affects rights of way, providing assistance with plan preparation or revision, as necessary.
  • Establish procedures for street closures or for repair or construction projects.
  • Compute time settings for traffic signals or speed restrictions, using standard formulas.
  • Visit development or work sites to determine projects' effect on traffic and the adequacy of traffic control and safety plans or to suggest traffic control measures.
  • Place and secure automatic counters, using power tools, and retrieve counters after counting periods end.
  • Measure and record the speed of vehicular traffic, using electrical timing devices or radar equipment.
  • Prepare graphs, charts, diagrams, or other aids to illustrate observations or conclusions.
  • Study traffic delays by noting times of delays, the numbers of vehicles affected, and vehicle speed through the delay area.
  • Time stoplights or other delays, using stopwatches.
  • Maintain or make minor adjustments or field repairs to equipment used in surveys, including the replacement of parts on traffic data gathering devices.
  • Interview motorists about specific intersections or highways to gather road-condition information for use in planning.
  • Develop plans or long-range strategies for providing adequate parking space.

Skills

Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.

Abilities

Extent Flexibility
The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Gross Body Coordination
The ability to coordinate the movement of your arms, legs, and torso together when the whole body is in motion.
Static Strength
The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Strength
The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue.
Stamina
The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Gross Body Equilibrium
The ability to keep or regain your body balance or stay upright when in an unstable position.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Work Style

Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Leadership
Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
Stress Tolerance
Job requires accepting criticism and dealing calmly and effectively with high stress situations.

Work Values

Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Agency of Transportation Technician (AOT Technician)
Automatic Traffic Recorder Technician (ATR Technician)
Civil Engineer
Civil Engineering Technician
Data Collection Technician
Engineering Aid
Engineering Planning Survey Technician
Engineering Technician
Field Traffic Data Technician
Field Traffic Investigator
GPS Analyst Technician (Global Positioning Systems Analyst Technician)
Planning Technician
Red Light Technician
Signal Engineer
Speed Zone Investigator
Survey Technician
Traffic Analyst
Traffic Control Technician
Traffic Designer
Traffic Engineer
Traffic Engineering Technician
Traffic Field Investigator
Traffic Inspector
Traffic Investigator
Traffic Monitor Specialist
Traffic Operations Engineer
Traffic Recorder Technician
Traffic Research Field Technician
Traffic Signal Technician (TST)
Traffic Systems Technician
Traffic Technician
Transportation Analyst
Transportation Planning Technician
Transportation Specialist
Transportation Technician
Weight in Motion Field Data Collection Technician

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$18.45 hourly, $38,380 annual.
Employment (2008):
6,340 employees