Welders, Cutters, and Welder Fitters

Description

Use hand-welding or flame-cutting equipment to weld or join metal components or to fill holes, indentations, or seams of fabricated metal products.

Tasks

  • Weld components in flat, vertical, or overhead positions.
  • Operate safety equipment and use safe work habits.
  • Lay out, position, align, and secure parts and assemblies prior to assembly, using straightedges, combination squares, calipers, and rulers.
  • Examine workpieces for defects and measure workpieces with straightedges or templates to ensure conformance with specifications.
  • Recognize, set up, and operate hand and power tools common to the welding trade, such as shielded metal arc and gas metal arc welding equipment.
  • Weld separately or in combination, using aluminum, stainless steel, cast iron, and other alloys.
  • Clamp, hold, tack-weld, heat-bend, grind or bolt component parts to obtain required configurations and positions for welding.
  • Select and install torches, torch tips, filler rods, and flux, according to welding chart specifications or types and thicknesses of metals.
  • Ignite torches or start power supplies and strike arcs by touching electrodes to metals being welded, completing electrical circuits.
  • Connect and turn regulator valves to activate and adjust gas flow and pressure so that desired flames are obtained.
  • Determine required equipment and welding methods, applying knowledge of metallurgy, geometry, and welding techniques.
  • Monitor the fitting, burning, and welding processes to avoid overheating of parts or warping, shrinking, distortion, or expansion of material.
  • Operate manual or semi-automatic welding equipment to fuse metal segments, using processes such as gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc, flux-cored arc, plasma arc, shielded metal arc, resistance welding, and submerged arc welding.
  • Analyze engineering drawings, blueprints, specifications, sketches, work orders, and material safety data sheets to plan layout, assembly, and welding operations.
  • Mark or tag material with proper job number, piece marks, and other identifying marks as required.
  • Chip or grind off excess weld, slag, or spatter, using hand scrapers or power chippers, portable grinders, or arc-cutting equipment.
  • Remove rough spots from workpieces, using portable grinders, hand files, or scrapers.
  • Prepare all material surfaces to be welded, ensuring that there is no loose or thick scale, slag, rust, moisture, grease, or other foreign matter.
  • Preheat workpieces prior to welding or bending, using torches or heating furnaces.
  • Develop templates and models for welding projects, using mathematical calculations based on blueprint information.
  • Position and secure workpieces, using hoists, cranes, wire, and banding machines or hand tools.
  • Guide and direct flames or electrodes on or across workpieces to straighten, bend, melt, or build up metal.
  • Detect faulty operation of equipment or defective materials and notify supervisors.
  • Clean or degrease parts, using wire brushes, portable grinders, or chemical baths.
  • Cut, contour, and bevel metal plates and structural shapes to dimensions as specified by blueprints, layouts, work orders, and templates, using powered saws, hand shears, or chipping knives.
  • Repair products by dismantling, straightening, reshaping, and reassembling parts, using cutting torches, straightening presses, and hand tools.
  • Fill holes, and increase the size of metal parts.
  • Check grooves, angles, or gap allowances, using micrometers, calipers, and precision measuring instruments.
  • Operate metal shaping, straightening, and bending machines, such as brakes and shears.
  • Set up and use ladders and scaffolding as necessary to complete work.
  • Hammer out bulges or bends in metal workpieces.
  • Dismantle metal assemblies or cut scrap metal, using thermal-cutting equipment such as flame-cutting torches or plasma-arc equipment.
  • Signal crane operators to move large workpieces.
  • Use fire suppression methods in industrial emergencies.
  • Estimate materials needed for production and manufacturing and maintain required stocks of materials.
  • Join parts such as beams and steel reinforcing rods in buildings, bridges, and highways, bolting and riveting as necessary.
  • Gouge metals, using the air-arc gouging process.
  • Mix and apply protective coatings to products.
  • Operate brazing and soldering equipment.
  • Melt lead bars, wire, or scrap to add lead to joints or to extrude melted scrap into reusable form.

Knowledge

Psychology
Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
Communications and Media
Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
Food Production
Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.

Skills

Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Innovation
Job requires creativity and alternative thinking to develop new ideas for and answers to work-related problems.
Leadership
Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
Analytical Thinking
Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Acetylene Cutter
Acetylene Torch Burner
Aluminum Welder
Arc Cutter
Arc Welder
Arc Welder Apprentice
Atomic Welder
Bar Welder
Bit Welder
Blade Worker
Body Welder
Boiler Welder
Burner
Butt Welder
Can Solderer
Combination Welder
Combination Welder Apprentice
Cutting Torch Operator
Die Welder
Electric Arc Welder
Electric Spot Welder
Electric Welder
Experimental Welder
Fabricator
Filament Welder
Flame Burner
Flame Cutter
Flash Welder
Gas Burner Operator
Gas Cutter
Gas Welder
Gas Welder Apprentice
Getter Welder
Gun Welder
Hand Thermal Cutter
Heliarc Welder
Helium Arc Welder
Induction Heating Equipment Setter
Iron Cutter
Lap Welder
Lead Burner
Lead Burner Apprentice
Liner Assembler
Maintenance Welder
Metal Welder
Mig Welder
Oxyacetylene Burner
Oxyacetylene Cutter
Oxyacetylene Torch Operator
Oxyacetylene Welder
Oxyhydrogen Welder
Pipe Welder
Production Line Welder
Production Welder
Rail Bonder
Robot Operator
Robotic Welder
Scrap Cutter
Scrap Iron Cutter
Scrap Metal Burner
Sheet Metal Welder
Shotweld Operator
Spot Welder
Steel Burner
Steel Cutter
Steel Welder
Stitch Welder
Sub Arc Operator
Tack Welder
Tank Truck Mechanic
Tank Welder
Thermite Welder
Torch Burner
Torch Cutter
Torch Heater

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$17.45 hourly, $36,300 annual.
Employment (2008):
329,710 employees