Woodworking Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Except Sawing

Description

Set up, operate, or tend woodworking machines, such as drill presses, lathes, shapers, routers, sanders, planers, and wood nailing machines. May operate CNC equipment.

Tasks

  • Start machines, adjust controls, and make trial cuts to ensure that machinery is operating properly.
  • Determine product specifications and materials, work methods, and machine setup requirements, according to blueprints, oral or written instructions, drawings, or work orders.
  • Feed stock through feed mechanisms or conveyors into planing, shaping, boring, mortising, or sanding machines to produce desired components.
  • Adjust machine tables or cutting devices and set controls on machines to produce specified cuts or operations.
  • Monitor operation of machines and make adjustments to correct problems and ensure conformance to specifications.
  • Set up, program, operate, or tend computerized or manual woodworking machines, such as drill presses, lathes, shapers, routers, sanders, planers, or wood-nailing machines.
  • Select knives, saws, blades, cutter heads, cams, bits, or belts, according to workpiece, machine functions, or product specifications.
  • Examine finished workpieces for smoothness, shape, angle, depth-of-cut, or conformity to specifications and verify dimensions, visually and using hands, rules, calipers, templates, or gauges.
  • Install and adjust blades, cutterheads, boring-bits, or sanding-belts, using hand tools and rules.
  • Inspect and mark completed workpieces and stack them on pallets, in boxes, or on conveyors so that they can be moved to the next workstation.
  • Push or hold workpieces against, under, or through cutting, boring, or shaping mechanisms.
  • Change alignment and adjustment of sanding, cutting, or boring machine guides to prevent defects in finished products, using hand tools.
  • Inspect pulleys, drive belts, guards, or fences on machines to ensure that machines will operate safely.
  • Remove and replace worn parts, bits, belts, sandpaper, or shaping tools.
  • Secure woodstock against a guide or in a holding device, place woodstock on a conveyor, or dump woodstock in a hopper to feed woodstock into machines.
  • Clean or maintain products, machines, or work areas.
  • Attach and adjust guides, stops, clamps, chucks, or feed mechanisms, using hand tools.
  • Examine raw woodstock for defects and to ensure conformity to size and other specification standards.
  • Set up, program, or control computer-aided design (CAD) or computer numerical control (CNC) machines.
  • Operate gluing machines to glue pieces of wood together, or to press and affix wood veneer to wood surfaces.
  • Sharpen knives, bits, or other cutting or shaping tools.
  • Trim wood parts according to specifications, using planes, chisels, or wood files or sanders.
  • Unclamp workpieces and remove them from machines.
  • Start machines and move levers to engage hydraulic lifts that press woodstocks into desired forms and disengage lifts after appropriate drying times.
  • Control hoists to remove parts or products from work stations.

Knowledge

Economics and Accounting
Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.

Skills

Science
Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.

Abilities

Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.

Work Activities

Performing Administrative Activities
Performing day-to-day administrative tasks such as maintaining information files and processing paperwork.
Selling or Influencing Others
Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.

Interests

Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.

Work Style

Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Independence
Job requires developing one's own ways of doing things, guiding oneself with little or no supervision, and depending on oneself to get things done.
Persistence
Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Achievement/Effort
Job requires establishing and maintaining personally challenging achievement goals and exerting effort toward mastering tasks.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

Work Values

Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Lay Titles

Adzing and Boring Machine Operator
Artificial Log Machine Operator
Automatic Clipper
Automatic Lathe Setup and Tooler
Automatic Nailing Machine Operator
Automatic Profile Shaper Operator
Balloon Sander
Band Nailer
Band Saw Operator
Bander
Bander Operator
Barker Operator
Barrel Builder
Barrel Charrer
Barrel Lathe Operator
Barrel Maker
Basket Assembler
Basket Braider
Basket Maker
Basket Weaver
Bender Machine Operator
Bending Frame Operator
Blind Slat Stapling Machine Operator
Board Finisher
Borer
Boring Machine Operator
Bottom Hoop Driver
Bottom Turning Lathe Tender
Bottom Turning Lathe Turner
Bowl Turner
Box Blank Machine Operator
Box Stapler
Box-Blank-Machine Operator
Briar Cutter
Bucker
Bucket Chucker
Bucket Turner
Cabinet Maker
Checkering Machine Adjuster
Chip Machine Operator
Chip Mixing Machine Operator
Chipper
Chipper Machine Operator
Chucking and Boring Machine Operator
Chucking Machine Operator
Chucking Machine Set Up Operator
Cleat Blanker
Cleat Maker
Cleater
Computer Numerical Control Operator (CNC Operator)
Copy Lathe Tender
Core Composer Feeder
Core Layer Machine Operator
Cork Grinder
Cork Molder
Corrugated Fastener Driver
Corrugator
Creosoting Engineer
Custom Shop Worker
Cylinder Sander Operator
Dado Operator
Dolly Operator
Dollyman
Door Clamper
Doors Prefitter
Double End Trimmer and Boring Machine Operator
Dovetail Machine Operator
Dovetailer
Dowel Inserting Machine Operator
Dowel Machine Operator
Dowel Maker
Doweler
Embossing Machine Operator
End Frazer
End Matcher

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$13.0 hourly, $27,030 annual.
Employment (2008):
61,110 employees